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Conservation interns/volunteers and Villanova students were able to study the collection for the first time since the collection's arrival in the 1950's. The top image features graduate Chemistry student Kirsten Watts and project intern Allison Rabent performing non-destructive pigment analysis using X-Ray Fluorescence. The bottom image features Villanova student Alexandra Stump and Professor Timothy McCall examining a triptych.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-10-15
Several paintings in the Ruspoli collection were also examined using x-radiography. The x-ray image of the Madonna (artist unknown) shown above shows that the artist made almost no changes to the composition during the painting process (the wooden plugs on the back of the painting are also visible in the x-ray image). The painting depicting a dark church interior (attributed to Peeter Neefs?) showed a hidden painting beneath the visible image. The artist cut down a larger composition and turned the canvas sideways (the image of a kneeling nun can be seen) before he began to paint the church scene on top.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-10-15
Outside scholars and Villanova faculty/staff were invited to examine the collection as well as Art History Departments from nearby institutions like Dr. Marcia Hall's class from Temple University (Also pictured in the Top Image: University of Delaware Professor Brian Baade, Professor Anthony Lagalante, Professor and Dean Adele Lindenmeyr, and Professor Timothy McCall)
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-10-26
Completed filling and toning losses throughout the entire composition. Prepared silicone molds and wax-resin paste to impart texture in large areas of loss.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-11-01
Completed filling and toning losses throughout the entire composition. Prepared silicone molds and wax-resin paste to impart texture in large areas of loss.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-11-03
The silicone is applied in a thin layer over designated areas of the painting using a rubber roller and mylar. After a 24 hour period the silicone cures and can be carefully peeled away from the surface, providing a perfect reverse of craquelure patterns and brush strokes.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-11-07
A clear silicone casting material was prepared before applying the silicone to the surface of the painting.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-11-07
Continued using silicone molds and wax-resin paste to impart texture in large areas of loss.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-12-01
Continued using silicone molds and wax-resin paste to impart texture in large areas of loss.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-12-01