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Continued cleaning and consolidation on upper section of painting. Began consolidation and overpaint/varnish removal throughout top half of painting.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-01
Continued cleaning and consolidation on upper half of painting. Significant portions of the sky and background architecture were found to be heavily overpainted (Pictured here: Ellen Nigro).
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-07
Removal of darkened, discolored overpaint and blanched varnish revealed a beautifully executed head depicting an older soldier.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-07
Significant areas of blanched varnish were found covering sections of the flowers, particularly the green leaves that were painted using green earth or terre verte
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-07
Viewing the painting using oblique, raking light helps to illuminate areas that remain covered by the thick, glossy varnish and overpaint. In this image only Abner's head, neck, and clothing has been cleaned.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-07
In normal visible light other details were noted during the cleaning process. Curious striations and patterns became visible throughout Abner's head and neck; upon closer inspection the team realized that the artist had made a significant change in this area of the composition. From the tiny losses in Abner's face it is possible to detect a cool, grey color coming from underlying paint layers. Read more in the Infrared Reflectography and X-Radiography sections.)
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-10
Conservators and scientists will occasionally collect tiny microscopic <a href="http://www.artcons.udel.edu/about/kress/examination-techniques-and-scientific-terms/cross-sectional-microscopy" target="_blank">samples</a> from artwork in order to obtain a better understanding of the object's restoration history as well as the original materials used by the artist(s). Samples are often taken in conspicuous areas, such as near regions of existing loss or even along outer edges of a composition. In the case of the <i>Triumph of David</i>, there were multiple old tears and losses scattered throughout the painting allowing for the collection of several paint samples. These samples are then embedded in a clear resin and polished smooth, giving a cross-section view of the paint layers from the ground up under high magnification.<br/><br/>Cross-sectional samples obtained from the "Triumph of David" were prepared by Kristen Watts and Dr. Amanda Norbutus from Villanova University's Chemistry Department. Samples were imbedded in Extec(R) polyester resin/ hardener (approximately 10/ 0.5 ml) and subsequently analyzed under high magnification using a Nikon Eclipse 80i Binocular Microscope (4x, 10x, and 20x objectives) with a Nikon X-cite(R) 120 Mercury Lamp for reflected ultraviolet light. Under ultraviolet light, the samples were viewed using a BV-2A cube (excitation wavelengths between 400 and 420/ 470 nm barrier filter). Digital images were obtained using the Digital Eclipse DXM 1200f Nikon Camera in conjunction with the Automatic Camera Tamer control software for PC systems.
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-16
This sample was collected from the blue robe of the kneeling woman after a cleaning test was performed to remove the degraded surface coating. The red-brown ground can be seen as well as two to three layers of blue paint containing ultramarine (lapis lazuli) with small additions of lead white (visible light/100x magnification).
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-16
This sample was collected from the heavily overpainted face of the child in the bottom right corner. The red-brown ground can be seen as well as scattered remaining fragments of the original flesh paint. The thin, uppermost glaze was later confirmed to be unoriginal restoration paint (visible light/100x magnification).
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-16
This sample was collected from the pink section of the robe worn by the kneeling woman after removal of the degraded surface coating. The red-brown ground can be seen as well as two to three layers of paint; the light yellow paint may be the underlying flesh paint of the woman's back while the uppermost pink paint corresponds to the drapery (visible light/100x magnification).
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-16
This sample was collected from the elbow of the kneeling woman before removal of the discolored overpaint. The red-brown ground can be seen as well as three layers of paint; the two paint layers directly atop the ground consist of lead white, vermillion, red lake, and naples yellow and represent the original flesh tones, while the uppermost layers was later confirmed to be unoriginal restoration paint (visible light/100x magnification).
timeline view   simple view
Date: 2014-01-16