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A mixture of pigment, waxes, and resin are made into a soft paste, that can then be applied atop large areas of loss that have already been filled with Modostuc. Once the wax-resin has dried edges of the fill can be carefully cleaned using a scalpel (Pictured Here: Project interns Keara Teeter and Serena Vella)
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Date: 2014-12-07
The silicone mold is placed atop the wax-resin and locally applied heat is used to impart texture. Once the wax-resin has cooled, the silicone mold is peeled away revealing the textured fill beneath. (Pictured Here: Project intern Serena Vella)
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Date: 2014-12-07
Students from a local high school visited the painting to learn about traditional painting practices and the analytical techniques employed by the conservation team. In this image the students decided to "re-enact" the scene depicted in "The Triumph of David."
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Date: 2014-12-15
The Philadelphia article provides an in-depth summary of the project and the progress that the conservation team has made thus far:<br/><a target="_blank" href="http://articles.philly.com/2014-12-26/news/57398481_1_painting-chemistry-layers">Link</a>
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Date: 2014-12-15
Since the completion of the 1950's restoration campaign, the painting has hung along the south wall of the Reading Room in Falvey Memorial Library.
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Date: 2013-09-01
Professional art handlers from Atelier Art Services assisted project conservators during the de-installation process. The painting together with the wooden stretcher weighs around 500 lbs. and measures approximately 12 by 20 ft. so multiple individuals are required to safely move the artwork. A temporary caged fence was built to allow visitors to visible access to the project during off-work hours.
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Date: 2013-09-01
It was important for conservators to be able to access both the front and back of the painting throughout the duration of the treatment. Four temporary wooden battens were constructed that safely supported the painting in an upright position against the East wall of the Reading Room. The construction was designed to specifically allow for temporary access to the painting's surface, enabling conservators to remove the front of each batten when it was deemed necessary. Pieces of soft Ethafoam were also used to protect the face of the painting from the battens.
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Date: 2013-09-01
<a href="http://artdaily.com/news/66144/Historic-Pietro-da-Cortona-painting-the-focus-of-collaborative-restoration-project-at-Villanova-University#.UoEQnvlJN15" target="_blank">Click here to view the article</a>
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Date: 2013-09-06
Prior to conducting treatment, conservators always perform a thorough examination and assessment of an artworks construction and condition. The support is composed of two large sections of plain-weave canvas (with a horizontal seam running through the center). At some point during a previous restoration campaign the original fabric support was completely lined or adhered to an additional canvas, presumably to aid in the repair of structurally compromised areas (e.g. planar deformations, tears, etc.). Finally, strips of canvas were adhered along all four edges of the canvas to provide additional strength to the tattered tacking margins.
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Date: 2013-09-11
Old tears in the canvas had re-opened and subsequently covered with various adhesives and overpaint. Here you can see the planar deformation caused by one tear running through the legs of King Saul.
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Date: 2013-09-11
Shown here is a detail of the small child in the lower right corner. Unfortunately past cleaning attempts utilized solvents/cleaning methods that caused damage to the original paint layers. As a result, a significant amount of overpaint was hastily applied over remaining areas of original paint throughout the child's face and torso.
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Date: 2013-09-11
A detail taken from the kneeling woman's back showing overpaint and significant paint loss. During a previous restoration campaign, several losses in the paint layer were left unfilled leaving the bare canvas exposed. Restorers then applied overpaint directly over these losses, staining the canvas beneath.
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Date: 2013-09-11
Shown here is a detail of an old tear running through the torso of the soldier on the left. The planar deformation caused by these tears suggests that they may be the result of prolonged compression of the paint and ground layers. The painting was likely rolled (as is common with most large format artworks) to facilitate transportation and storage and may have experienced an uneven distribution of weight during this period.
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Date: 2013-09-11
Drips of old, degraded varnish were present in certain areas of the painting. The blue marker signifies an area where a small sample was collected for analysis. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmed the presence of a natural resin varnish (mastic resin).
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Date: 2013-09-11
A detail showing an old fill applied during a previous restoration campaign to an area of loss in the paint and ground layers. Many of the existing fills that were found throughout the painting were found to be in good condition.
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Date: 2013-09-11